Red Music Studio
By David McClure

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Year
1982
Media
Printmaking
Subject Matter
Domestic and Home - People
Reg. Number
G1252
Size
32 x 38 cm

In this atmospheric print, David McCLure unites a woman and a grand piano by using an intense red colour for her surroundings and covering the whole print with busy patterns. The woman’s clothes have the same pattern as the piano yet her face remains clear amongst the chaos around her. The book of sheet music in the centre exudes an outburst of music, represented by the vivid and energetic colours & patterns.

David McClure (1926-1998) was born in Lochwinnoch in Renfrewshire in 1926. During the Second World War, he worked as a coal miner, which would strongly influence his future work. He studied at the Edinburgh College of Art from 1947-1952, where where his contemporaries included noted Scottish artists such as Elizabeth Blackadder, John Houston and David Michie. In his earlier career he travelled across Europe, and his work demonstrates a distinct Mediterranean influence in its use of colours and light. In 1957 he was appointed Lecturer in Painting at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee, a position he held until 1983, when he took over as Head of Painting from his great friend and colleague Alberto Morrocco.

He was elected to the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolour in 1965, the Royal Scottish Academy in 1971 and the Royal Glasgow Institute in 1990. His work can be found in collections across Britain including the University of Dundee, the Scottish Arts Council, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, the University of St Andrews and British Rail, as well as private collections worldwide in North America, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Turkey and Norway. His numerous solo and group exhibitions include displays in Edinburgh, Birmingham, London, Palermo and Toronto. He died in 1998, on his 72nd birthday.

“His art was further enriched by his regard for the French Post-Impressionists, painterly and richly coloured in a long-standing Scottish tradition. Always informed by an intellectual rigour and reference to the wider history of art, literature and music, it is celebratory of the good things in life and nature and of the art of picture making.”

With thanks to the Scottish Gallery for artist information

With thanks to McClure Art for artist information