Ayr Harbour
By Rosemary Beaton

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Year
1986
Media
Watercolour
Subject Matter
Sea and Boats
Reg. Number
L233
Size
53 x 63 cm

The watercolour 'Ayr Harbour' demonstrates her individual colour sense and the colours she sees in nature. There is an urgency to capture the moment in this image which suggests it may have been done outdoors. The crooked lines and odd perspective give this drawing a playful and vibrant feel. Movement is suggested in the water through daubs of different colours of paint and in the sky by the soaring bird. The image depicts a harbour with two boats in the foreground. A line of buildings can be made out in the background, although some parts are obscured by the washes of paint. The houses are drawn with only a basic outline and the church spire is depicted with only a few strokes in order to give a feel for it rather than an accurate representation. The most solid part of the image is the harbour wall which leads the eye from the foreground to the buildings in the background. It is interesting to note that Beaton spent time living and working in Venice, which could explain the slightly Italian feel of this work; the arched bridges and the waterside setting.

Alongside European influences which she picked up on her travels, Rosemary was also inspired by the landscape and artists in Scotland, in particular the Scottish colourists such as F.C.B Caddell.

'Pure painting, the language of forms and colours and the elegance and simplicity of draughtsmanship' are considered by Rosemary as her main concerns. She has a very individual colour sense and a love for combining humour and odd juxtapositions of people and places in her work. She studied in GSA between 1981-86, and in 1984, whilst still studying, she won the National Portrait Award from the National Portrait Gallery in London.