Easel in Landscape
By Gordon Bryce

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Year
1992
Media
Oil Painting
Subject Matter
Landscape
Reg. Number
P250
Size
171 x 180 cm

A lone female figure stands by her easel in the far distance of this landscape, not immediately noticeable given the sheer magnitude of her surroundings that dominate this composition. The energy of nature's force is clearly demonstrated by the bold shapes cast by the trees, the smooth flat use of paint and the expanse of differing shades of green that command attention in this scene. Shadows and reflections are cast across the ground as the sunlight pushes through the trees. The striking blue of the sky conveys the impression that the figure is enjoying a clear warm day in which to observe and capture the tranquillity of her immediate natural environment.

Born in Edinburgh in 1943, Gordon became interested in art at school where his art teacher at Edinburgh Academy, John Firth, first noticed his aptitude for art and nurtured the young pupils interest. Gordon would often be found at the weekends visiting his art masters studio to work there. His interest was further fueled when he won a place at Edinburgh College of Art in 1960. Here he studied under Sir Robin Philipson and Sir William Gillies, two of Scotlands most notable painters. In 1968 Bryce moved to Aberdeen to take up a post at Grays School of Art, where he first taught printmaking. Alongside printmaking, he practised as a painter in oils and watercolour. In 1976, he was elected to both the Royal Scottish Society of Watercolourists and the Royal Scottish Academy. In due course he was appointed to Head of Fine Art at Grays, where he remained until he resigned his post in 1995 to concentrate full-time on his painting, developing his own concepts and approaches.

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